Job hunting

Job hunting tips

Job hunting involves more than searching for open positions and sending your resume to employers. You also need to make sure you’re a good fit for the job, can catch the hiring manager’s attention and are well-prepared to answer interview questions. Here are some tips that you can use to improve your chances of finding the employment you desire:

  1. Know your career goals
  2. Make a plan
  3. Use all job search resources
  4.  Make a list of interesting companies and start researching
  5. Find contacts and make contact
  6. Direct contact with a company
  7. Network regularly
  8. Example of a job hunting in a specific country
  9. Jobs in Europe
  10. Work experience/internships and fast tracks

1. Know your career goals

Another example of differences can be found in the use of social media networks for business purposes. Here’s an example for Europe: While LinkedIn is one of the primary professional social networks in Luxemburg and the Netherlands, Germanys’ most used business network is called Xing and in France it is Viadeo.

2. Make a plan

Organize yourself and your schedule to search for jobs more efficiently. Determine how many hours per day or what days of the week you will dedicate to job hunting or networking.One example of a schedule is that you set off three hours three days a week for job hunting.

3. Use all job search resources

Rather than limiting yourself to manual online searches, take advantage of all job search options. This might include reaching out to companies or hiring managers in person, attending digital career fairs or searching social media. Use job search engines to find openings on job boards, company websites, professional associations and more. Sign up for daily job alerts by email.

4. Make a list of interesting companies and start researching

Start with making a list of companies that you would like to work for. Make a note of why you are interested in just these specific companies. This information can be used when you are contacting the company directly.

As you find job postings that interest you, research the hiring companies before applying. This can provide you with information about their company culture, salary level, products and services and work environment. Your research will tell you whether you want to or are qualified to work for that company.

5. Find contacts and make contact

When you research the companies on your “Interesting companies list” try to find contacts that you can contact through Linkedin, email or phone to get a feeling of the company

Find out whether you are a good fit for a job by requesting informational interviews with someone working in these companies’ fields or even better try to make an informal contact at the company that you are interested in.

6. Direct contact with a company

If you are interested in working at a specific company, it may be a good idea to apply for a job with them directly. Many companies include information on available positions on their websites. If you don’t find career information on a company’s website, you can contact them directly to ask if they can accept an open application.

7. Network regularly

Interact with people and develop professional contacts both online and in person. Let them know you’re looking for a job or want to work in a certain industry. They might have connections or advice that can help you in your job search. You might also discover unlisted job openings or people might recommend you for future opportunities. This is a process that you should do at all times even though you are not planning to look for a job abroad today.

8. Example of a job hunting in a specific country

Every  European country has a list of job portals. Both governmental and private. Here you will find sites for job hunting in a example country: Sweden. If you are interested in finding the best job portal per European country you can either search Baidu or any other search engine or find a company that can help you with a short list of the best job portals for the country that you are interested in.

The Swedish Public Employment Agency’s (Arbetsförmedlingen) offers support to people looking for work. It offers information, advice and support. Then there are many privately run job sites commonly used to find a job in Sweden. These websites usually include job listings (often in Swedish) and functions where you can upload your CV. Some of these job sites are:

The labour shortage list
The Swedish Migration Agency together with the Public Employment Agency regularly put together a list of occupations that are in high demand in Sweden, the labour shortage list (only in Swedish). Check it out – because if you are offered a job in a highly demanded occupation (i.e. one on this list), you can apply for a work permit from Sweden instead of having to return to your home country to apply. (Unfortunately, the list is only available in Swedish, so you may need to paste the link above into a web translation tool.)

9. Jobs in Europe

Another good starting point for job seekers is the EURES database. It’s a collection of job listings from EU countries’ public employment agencies and run by the EU Public Employment Service.

EURES is also very useful if you’re a non-EU citizen who needs a work permit. If you’re offered a job, your employer must have advertised the job in the EU/European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland for at least ten days. This is one of the basic requirements to be eligible for a Sweden European work permit, and EURES makes that easier. The terms of employment you have been offered must also match those set by the country´s collective agreements or those that are customary within the occupation or industry.

You can get in touch with EURES on Facebook or chat with an advisor at EURES.

Job listings in Europe (example sites)

10. Work experience/internships and fast tracks

Another way to get into the Swedish workforce is to participate in work experience/get an internship at a workplace. This gives you vocational experience, vocational orientation or experience in working life, which could give you a head start when applying for a proper job later on.

Useful links

  • Korta vägen (‘the short cut’) – a nationwide programme offering foreign academics a fast track to the Swedish employment market; arranged by the Swedish Public Employment Agency (link to Folkuniversitetet, one of the educational associations involved).
  • Work experience via the Migration Agency – the opportunity for asylum seekers to get work experience while waiting for an asylum decision.

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